Betsie DeVos as Secretary of Education Will Not Be Good for Disabled Students

Editor’s note: As an organization that strives to advocate for the equal and inclusive education of all blind and visually impaired students, we believe that Betsy DeVos, the nominee for Secretary of Education under Donald Trump’s administration is unfit to lead the Department of Education which oversees federal laws ensuring an equal education for students with disabilities.

The article below, written by a former ACBS Student Advocate Editor and board member, highlights many reasons why Mrs. DeVos would negatively impact the educational opportunities and quality for students with disabilities. This article also serves as a call to action. It is imperative that we make our concerns about Mrs. DeVos’s nomination for Secretary of Education loud and clear to our elected members of Congress. We strongly urge all of you to take a few minutes on Monday, January 23 and call your state Senators to express your opposition to the confirmation of Betsy DeVos. At the end of the article, you will find a comprehensive listing of the current United States Senators and their contact information, organized alphabetically by state.

By Zackery Olson

As you can probably tell from the title of this post, I’m not one for mincing words, so I won’t waste time getting to the point. There are any number of reasons that Betsie DeVos is an unfit pick for Secretary of Education. For the purposes of this post, I’ll only be talking about those issues that will most impact students with disabilities. First, some background is necessary. Bear with me if you already know all or some of this.

I think it’s helpful to first outline the functions and responsibilities of the Department of Education, so that we are acquainted with the things Mrs. DeVos will be in charge of. From here forward, I will for the sake of brevity refer to the department as ED, as is done on the official web page of ED. The “About” page of ED’s site gives its mission statement as follows:

“ED's mission is to promote student achievement and preparation for global competitiveness by fostering educational excellence and ensuring equal access.”

That same page puts the number of ED employees at 4,400 and the department’s budget at $68 billion per year. ED’s employees and budget are focussed upon several different functions. First, ED sets federal financial aid policies and also distributes the funds allocated to the implementation of those policies. ED also gathers and disperses school data from a number of sources which include data gathered by ED employees, data from the National Center for Education Statistics, outside contractors, and researchers who have received grants from ED. Another function of ED is to make sure that the American public is aware of important educational issues. Finally, and probably most relevant to us, ED is charged with the prohibition of discrimination and also enforcing equal educational access for all students.

For K-12 students, there are several federal laws that affect educational opportunities. One is Chapter 408 of the Laws of 2002 as amended by Chapter 279 of the Laws of 2012. What a mouthful that is, right? Continuing, Chapter 408 deals with making copies of a student’s IEP readily available to all involved in the design and implementation of their educational accommodations. Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 sets forth the provision that no person with a disability may be denied services under or discriminated against by any program receiving federal funding, including schools that receive funding from ED. Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act prohibits discrimination in state services, including public schooling. The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, or IDEA for short, is the law that all of us are probably somewhat familiar with. According to the Center for Parent Information and Resources, IDEA was established in 1975 and has since been amended, both in 2004 and 2011. The quick rundown of what IDEA covers is as follows:

•Educational accommodations tailored to meet the individual needs of students with disabilities
•An Individualized Education Program (IEP) that sets forth the needs of the student, necessary accommodations, and educational goals of the student, among other things
•Provision by schools of evaluation(s) of no cost to students’ parents or the students themselves for any student suspected of having a learning disability
•Federal funding for schools to put toward meeting the needs of disabled students
•Requisite prior notification of any changes to the services a student receives before those changes go into effect
•In case of IEP disagreements between parents and schools, a requirement that all of a students current services continue during the resolution of the IEP dispute, known as a “stay put” provision
•Attainment of a free and appropriate public education (FAPE) in the least restrictive environment, which is usually a general education classroom
•Safeguards that outline what schools are allowed to do and disallowed from doing during evaluations and provision of special education services and any other related services
•Due process for the resolution of disagreements between parents and schools

Okay, so maybe “short rundown” wasn’t the right phrase to use before that list. In any case, those are the rights set forth by IDEA. They are largely to be enforced by the states, but there are a number of ways the Secretary of Education can influence the way states provide and enforce the provisions of IDEA. More on that later.

Now, let’s get to the background on Mrs. DeVos herself. The following information is taken from an article penned by Zack Stanton (do sighted people even still use pens these days?) for Politico Magazine, but bits of it are substantiated in other publications including the New York Times and Washington Post. Elizabeth “Betsie” DeVos was born Elizabeth Prince. She is the daughter of wealthy Michigander Edgar Prince, who made his fortune after founding in 1965 a small company that manufactured automotive products. To give you an idea of what I mean when I say “wealthy,” that company later came to be worth a cool $1 billion. Mrs. DeVos attended private schools for her entire education. While attending Calvin College, Betsie volunteered in the 1975-76 Presidential campaign of Gerald R. Ford. It was this that brought her into contact with numerous people in the Michigan political sphere and also led to her meeting her future husband, Richard “Dick” DeVos Jr. Dick DeVos’s father is Richard DeVos, multi billionaire founder of AmWay. Betsie DeVos graduated Calvin with a degree in business and political science. Yes, you read that correctly, business and political science, not education.

After graduating Calvin, Mrs. DeVos became gradually involved in the movement for school choice. School vouchers became her particular area of focus within that movement. After a failed bid by Dick DeVos to be elected to Michigan state government, the DeVos family turned to a different strategy: pumping large sums of their considerable fortune into lobbying legislators. The strategy proved successful and, as a result, largely unaccountable charter schools have proliferated in Michigan, particularly in Detroit.

Mrs. DeVos was of course nominated for the cabinet position of Secretary of Education by our new President. Since then, her nomination has been met with mixed reactions. People who are personally familiar with Mrs. DeVos and people she has worked with in the past have expressed their belief that she is an excellent pick for the position due to her self-proclaimed dedication to creating an environment in which all children can get the best possible education. A notable exception to this view comes from Sen. Cory Booker (D-NJ) who has worked with DeVos previously on school reform measures. Booker is quoted in a December interview with nonprofit and nonpartisan education news site The 74 as saying he has “serious early concerns” about Mrs. DeVos being nominated. More notable, and more troubling, than Booker’s statement is the fact that the two biggest teachers unions in the country, the American Federation of Teachers (AFT) and the National Education Association (NAE), vehemently oppose DeVos being nominated for the Secretary of Education position. For her part, DeVos has no love for the unions either. She spoke negatively of unions in a 2015 speech and, more substantively, she and her husband have lobbied for right-to-work legislation that negatively impacts unions. Further, the Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights, a coalition composed of over 200 organizations which include the American Association of People with Disabilities; the American Civil Liberties Union; The ARC, an organization that advocates for and serves people with intellectual and developmental disabilities; the Disability Rights Education and Defense Fund; and our very own American Council of the Blind. In addition, during Mrs. DeVos’s confirmation hearing in front of the U.S. Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions, ranking committee member Sen. Patty Murray (D-WA) asked that thirty-six letters of opposition, signed by a total of one-hundred-thirty-three organizations be entered into the record of the hearing.

As for the hearing itself, reactions include mystification and alarm. When Sen Al Franken (D-MN) asked Mrs. DeVos a question about a well-known and long-debated issue over whether or not test scores should be used to measure student proficiency or student growth, she seemed to have no knowledge of the issue, replying only with a flustered request for clarification. Though this is not related specifically to IDEA or students with disabilities, I bring it up as an illustration of Mrs. DeVos’s lack of knowledge even in the area of general education. It’s not the sort of thing that inspires confidence in her potential knowledge of issues facing students with disabilities. As it turns out, my concern is fully warranted. As noted by the Washington Post, and as can be seen in the video of the hearing which is available on the C-SPAN website, Mrs. DeVos’s answers to the questions directed to her by Sen Tim Kaine (D-VA) suggest a woeful and, for a person who has been nominated for perhaps the most important education position in the country, inexcusable lack of knowledge about what IDEA actually is.

The first question Sen. Kaine asked of Mrs. DeVos that relates to students with disabilities and the enforcement of IDEA was whether or not she agreed that all K-12 schools that receive federal funding should be held to the same accountability standards. Mrs. DeVos first response was to attempt to set a distinction between standards for traditional public schools and charter schools. When pressed further for a clear yes-or-no answer to his question, DeVos would only repeat, “I support accountability.” Upon further insistence from Sen. Kaine that she answer the question clearly and without equivocation, Mrs. DeVos answered that she did not agree with Sen. Kaine’s assertion that all schools receiving federal funds should be subject to equal accountability under IDEA. Near the end of the hearing, Sen. Maggie Hassan (D-NH) directed the focus back to IdEA. Hassan explained to Mrs. DeVos the nature of IDEA as a federal law and asked her if she still believed that adherence to the law was a matter of state determination. Having presumably learned an object lesson from Sen. Kaine’s emphatic inquiries, Mrs. DeVos answer was, “Federal law must be followed where federal dollars are in play.” This answer was, at best, a shaky recovery after already showing that she was ridiculously ill informed for a person standing before the Senate in consideration for a position in the U.S. Presidential cabinet.

Now that we’ve finally worked our way through all the pertinent background, let’s move on to unpacking the implications of Betsie DeVos as Secretary of Education. As I’ve pointed out, Mrs. DeVos’s particular raison d’être is school vouchers. Voucher programs are established at the state level. If the parents of a student, or the student, decide that their local public school is not the school they want to attend, then the federal money that would normally be given to the public school to support the student’s education will be given instead to whatever school the student ends up attending, as long as that school is included in the state’s voucher program. This means that federal money, money that is much-needed by public schools, can go to a charter or parochial school that faces few accountability measures. Any school receiving funding from the federal government is subject to the provisions and standards of IDEA, Section 504, Title II, and Chapter 408. Schools that do not receive federal funding are not subject. This means that private charter and religious schools are not obligated to provide any accommodations to students with disabilities, though some still do. If more states were to adopt voucher programs, there could be an outflow of students from public schools to private ones. This would mean less overall funding for those public schools, which could, and in some districts likely would, negatively impact disabled students, given the fact that special education programs being underfunded is not an uncommon occurrence, nor are cuts to special education funding in instances where districts need to better balance their budgets.

On the flip side, the potential positive effect of voucher programs on students with disabilities is that they might be able to attend a charter school that has a better record than their local public school, perhaps one with a smaller student population and a finer focus on evidence-based learning methods, which would be better able to attend to the needs of that student. With that possibility in mind, it must be noted, as it is in a post by Christina Samuels on the blog of edweek.org, that this is not a likely outcome. The post points to a report compiled by the Council for Parent Attorneys and Advocates, a group that focusses on insuring the civil rights of students with disabilities, in which it is noted that private schools have the option to deny students entry because of their disabilities, even those participating in some state voucher programs. This would effectively force students with disabilities to stay in public schools that may become further and further defunded. The report also notes that there is no substantial evidence to show that disabled students who leave public schools for private ones perform at a higher level than those who stay in public schools. Perhaps most distressing is a notation in the report that in some states students with disabilities must wave their IDEA due process rights to participate in voucher programs. This is a point also highlighted in an NEA policy brief on voucher programs. What’s more, for those students who do end up attending public schools, either by choice or because of a lack of better options, Mrs. DeVos will be the top authority in charge of enforcing the provisions of the pertinent laws prohibiting discrimination and insuring that due process is followed under IDEA provisions.

To review, Mrs. DeVos has herself never attended a public school and so has no experience in being a student at one. Nor does she have the experience of being the parent of children attending public schools, as her children exclusively attended private schools. Worse than that, she has no training or formal background in education, let alone the concentration of special education. As an education major, I learned quickly that teachers do a great deal more than some people may think. They have to plan assignments with particular attention to state learning standards, manage their classrooms, deal with disciplinary issues, use extrinsic motivators to assure student participation while at the same time trying to instill intrinsic motivation and a love of learning, and that’s just the tip-top of the iceberg. Special education teachers have the added complication of crafting and implementing IEPs, making sure IEP goals serve both their students’ specific disability-related needs as well as state learning standards, performing disability-related evaluations, adapting assignments and learning materials to make them accessible for their students, creating the right balance of time their students spend with them and in their primary class or classes, and even more. Mrs. DeVos’s responses to questioning at her confirmation hearing demonstrate a disconcerting lack of knowledge in the areas of general education fundamentals and special education specifics. Mrs. DeVos was nominated in November of last year, and one might think she would have taken the time to familiarize herself with at least the basics. Starting from such a knowledge deficit makes it unlikely that she will be able to learn all that she needs to before assuming the Secretary of Education position, nor does it suggest that she will be able to learn both education fundamentals and the functioning of the Department of Education on the job. In my mind, this gross lack of preparedness alone disqualifies her from being eligible for the position. Add her opposition of unions and her zealous pursuit of massively expanding state school voucher programs which will doubtless have negative effects for disabled students, and I frankly cannot imagine how anyone could think her a fit nominee. There is also her investment in private for-profit charter schools and involvement with school choice organizations to consider, though I did not have the time to fully outline those important conflicts of interest while writing this post. My apologies.

So what can we do about this? To be honest, we’re in the bottom of the ninth with two out on this one. The vote on Mrs. DeVos nomination is scheduled for Tuesday, January 24. That doesn’t mean we can’t still mount an effort and perhaps convince enough Senators to vote against her confirmation. I think one very important thing we can do is to write personalized letters to our Senators and fax them off on Monday. For those who do not have access to an actual fax machine, MyFax is an accessible online fax service that offers a free trial period. Personalized letters, far more than signatures on online petitions or posts on the social media accounts of those Senators, have the potential to sway votes. They can attach individual identities to this issue and move it out of the realm of abstraction and into the real world. We can also flood our Senators’ phone lines and demand that they vote against Mrs. DeVos’s confirmation. We can also ask our families, friends, and teachers to do the same, particularly our current or past TVIs and mobility instructors. You can find the contact information for your members of Congress at the web page of the nonpartisan organization Common Cause. All you have to do is plug in your street address, city, state, and zip code and you can get the phone number, fax number, and email address for your members of Congress. The site seems to be up to date, except that it still lists Barack Obama and Joe Biden as President and Vice President.

Mrs. DeVos may still end up being confirmed, but at the very least we can send a loud message that we are vigilant and determined to maintain and improve the quality of education for students with disabilities. Though there is still far for us to go, we have come a long distance up to this point, and we must do what we can to insure that our educational rights do not regress.

Listing of United States Senators organized alphabetically by state:

Alabama:
Sessions, Jeff - (R - AL)
326 Russell Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-4124
Contact:
www.sessions.senate.gov/public/index.cfm/contact-jeff

Shelby, Richard C. - (R - AL)
304 Russell Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-5744
Contact:
www.shelby.senate.gov/public/index.cfm/emailsenatorshelby

Alaska:
Murkowski, Lisa - (R - AK)
522 Hart Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-6665
Contact:
www.murkowski.senate.gov/public/index.cfm/contact

Sullivan, Dan - (R - AK)
702 Hart Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-3004
Contact:
www.sullivan.senate.gov/contact/email

Arizona:
Flake, Jeff - (R - AZ)
413 Russell Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-4521
Contact:
www.flake.senate.gov/public/index.cfm/contact-jeff

McCain, John - (R - AZ)
218 Russell Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-2235
Contact:
www.mccain.senate.gov/public/index.cfm/contact-form

Arkansas:
Boozman, John - (R - AR)
141 Hart Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-4843
Contact:
www.boozman.senate.gov/public/index.cfm/contact

Cotton, Tom - (R - AR)
124 Russell Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-2353
Contact:
www.cotton.senate.gov/?p=contact

California:
Feinstein, Dianne - (D - CA)
331 Hart Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-3841
Contact:
www.feinstein.senate.gov/public/index.cfm/e-mail-me

Harris, Kamala D. - (D - CA)
B40B Dirksen Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-3553
Contact:
www.harris.senate.gov/content/contact-senator

Colorado:
Bennet, Michael F. - (D - CO)
261 Russell Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-5852
Contact:
www.bennet.senate.gov/?p=contact

Gardner, Cory - (R - CO)
354 Russell Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-5941
Contact:
www.gardner.senate.gov/contact-cory/email-cory

Connecticut:
Blumenthal, Richard - (D - CT)
706 Hart Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-2823
Contact:
www.blumenthal.senate.gov/contact/

Murphy, Christopher - (D - CT)
136 Hart Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-4041
Contact:
www.murphy.senate.gov/contact

Delaware:
Carper, Thomas R. - (D - DE)
513 Hart Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-2441
Contact:
www.carper.senate.gov/public/index.cfm/email-senator-carper

Coons, Christopher A. - (D - DE)
127A Russell Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-5042
Contact:
www.coons.senate.gov/contact

Florida:
Nelson, Bill - (D - FL)
716 Hart Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-5274
Contact:
www.billnelson.senate.gov/contact-bill

Rubio, Marco - (R - FL)
284 Russell Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-3041
Contact:
www.rubio.senate.gov/public/index.cfm/contact

Georgia:
Isakson, Johnny - (R - GA)
131 Russell Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-3643
Contact:
www.isakson.senate.gov/public/index.cfm/email-me

Perdue, David - (R - GA)
383 Russell Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-3521
Contact:
www.perdue.senate.gov/connect/email

Hawaii:
Hirono, Mazie K. - (D - HI)
330 Hart Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-6361
Contact:
www.hirono.senate.gov/contact

Schatz, Brian - (D - HI)
722 Hart Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-3934
Contact:
www.schatz.senate.gov/contact

Idaho:
Crapo, Mike - (R - ID)
239 Dirksen Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-6142
Contact:
www.crapo.senate.gov/contact/email.cfm

Risch, James E. - (R - ID)
483 Russell Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-2752
Contact:
www.risch.senate.gov/public/index.cfm?p=Email

Illinois:
Duckworth, Tammy - (D - IL)
G12 Dirksen Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-2854
Contact:
www.duckworth.senate.gov/content/contact-senator

Durbin, Richard J. - (D - IL)
711 Hart Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-2152
Contact:
www.durbin.senate.gov/contact/

Indiana:
Donnelly, Joe - (D - IN)
720 Hart Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-4814
Contact:
www.donnelly.senate.gov/contact/email-joe

Young, Todd - (R - IN)
B33 Russell Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-5623
Contact:
www.young.senate.gov/content/contact-senator

Iowa:
Ernst, Joni - (R - IA)
111 Russell Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-3254
Contact:
www.ernst.senate.gov/public/index.cfm/contact

Grassley, Chuck - (R - IA)
135 Hart Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-3744
Contact:
www.grassley.senate.gov/contact

Kansas:
Moran, Jerry - (R - KS)
521 Dirksen Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-6521
Contact:
www.moran.senate.gov/public/index.cfm/e-mail-jerry

Roberts, Pat - (R - KS)
109 Hart Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-4774
Contact:
www.roberts.senate.gov/public/?p=EmailPat

Kentucky:
McConnell, Mitch - (R - KY)
317 Russell Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-2541
Contact:
www.mcconnell.senate.gov/public/index.cfm?p=contact

Paul, Rand - (R - KY)
167 Russell Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-4343
Contact:
www.paul.senate.gov/connect/email-rand

Louisiana:
Cassidy, Bill - (R - LA)
703 Hart Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-5824
Contact:
www.cassidy.senate.gov/contact

Kennedy, John - (R - LA)
B11 Russell Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-4623
Contact:
www.kennedy.senate.gov/content/contact-senator

Maine:
Collins, Susan M. - (R - ME)
413 Dirksen Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-2523
Contact:
www.collins.senate.gov/contact

King, Angus S., Jr. - (I - ME)
133 Hart Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-5344
Contact:
www.king.senate.gov/contact

Maryland:
Cardin, Benjamin L. - (D - MD)
509 Hart Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-4524
Contact:
www.cardin.senate.gov/contact/

Van Hollen, Chris - (D - MD)
B40C Dirksen Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-4654
E-mail:
correspondence@vanhollen.senate.gov

Massachusetts:
Markey, Edward J. - (D - MA)
255 Dirksen Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-2742
Contact:
www.markey.senate.gov/contact

Warren, Elizabeth - (D - MA)
317 Hart Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-4543
Contact:
www.warren.senate.gov/?p=email_senator

Michigan:
Peters, Gary C. - (D - MI)
724 Hart Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-6221
Contact:
www.peters.senate.gov/contact/email-gary

Stabenow, Debbie - (D - MI)
731 Hart Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-4822
Contact:
www.stabenow.senate.gov/?p=contact

Minnesota:
Franken, Al - (D - MN)
309 Hart Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-5641
Contact:
www.franken.senate.gov/?p=contact

Klobuchar, Amy - (D - MN)
302 Hart Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-3244
Contact:
www.klobuchar.senate.gov/public/contact-amy

Mississippi:
Cochran, Thad - (R - MS)
113 Dirksen Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-5054
Contact:
www.cochran.senate.gov/public/index.cfm/email-me

Wicker, Roger F. - (R - MS)
555 Dirksen Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-6253
Contact:
www.wicker.senate.gov/public/index.cfm/contact

Missouri:
Blunt, Roy - (R - MO)
260 Russell Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-5721
Contact:
www.blunt.senate.gov/public/index.cfm/contact-roy

McCaskill, Claire - (D - MO)
730 Hart Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-6154
Contact:
www.mccaskill.senate.gov/contact

Montana:
Daines, Steve - (R - MT)
320 Hart Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-2651
Contact:
www.daines.senate.gov/connect/email-steve

Tester, Jon - (D - MT)
311 Hart Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-2644
Contact:
www.tester.senate.gov/?p=email_senator

Nebraska:
Fischer, Deb - (R - NE)
454 Russell Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-6551
Contact:
www.fischer.senate.gov/public/index.cfm/contact

Sasse, Ben - (R - NE)
386A Russell Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-4224
Contact:
www.sasse.senate.gov/public/index.cfm/email-ben

Nevada:
Cortez Masto, Catherine - (D - NV)
B40A Dirksen Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-3542
Contact:
www.cortezmasto.senate.gov/content/contact-senator

Heller, Dean - (R - NV)
324 Hart Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-6244
Contact:
www.heller.senate.gov/public/index.cfm/contact-form

New Hampshire:
Hassan, Margaret Wood - (D - NH)
II B85 Russell Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-3324
Contact:
www.hassan.senate.gov/content/contact-senator

Shaheen, Jeanne - (D - NH)
506 Hart Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-2841
Contact:
www.shaheen.senate.gov/contact/contact-jeanne

New Jersey:
Booker, Cory A. - (D - NJ)
359 Dirksen Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-3224
Contact:
www.booker.senate.gov/?p=contact

Menendez, Robert - (D - NJ)
528 Hart Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-4744
Contact:
www.menendez.senate.gov/contact

New Mexico:
Heinrich, Martin - (D - NM)
303 Hart Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-5521
Contact:
www.heinrich.senate.gov/contact

Udall, Tom - (D - NM)
531 Hart Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-6621
Contact:
www.tomudall.senate.gov/?p=contact

New York:
Gillibrand, Kirsten E. - (D - NY)
478 Russell Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-4451
Contact:
www.gillibrand.senate.gov/contact/

Schumer, Charles E. - (D - NY)
322 Hart Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-6542
Contact:
www.schumer.senate.gov/contact/email-chuck

North Carolina:
Burr, Richard - (R - NC)
217 Russell Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-3154
Contact:
www.burr.senate.gov/contact/email

Tillis, Thom - (R - NC)
185 Dirksen Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-6342
Contact:
www.tillis.senate.gov/public/index.cfm/email-me

North Dakota:
Heitkamp, Heidi - (D - ND)
110 Hart Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-2043
Contact:
www.heitkamp.senate.gov/public/index.cfm/contact

Hoeven, John - (R - ND)
338 Russell Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-2551
Contact:
www.hoeven.senate.gov/public/index.cfm/email-the-senator

Ohio:
Brown, Sherrod - (D - OH)
713 Hart Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-2315
Contact:
www.brown.senate.gov/contact/

Portman, Rob - (R - OH)
448 Russell Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-3353
Contact:
www.portman.senate.gov/public/index.cfm/contact?p=contact...

Oklahoma:
Inhofe, James M. - (R - OK)
205 Russell Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-4721
Contact:
www.inhofe.senate.gov/contact

Lankford, James - (R - OK)
316 Hart Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-5754
Contact:
www.lankford.senate.gov/contact/email

Oregon:
Merkley, Jeff - (D - OR)
313 Hart Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-3753
Contact:
www.merkley.senate.gov/contact/

Wyden, Ron - (D - OR)
221 Dirksen Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-5244
Contact:
www.wyden.senate.gov/contact/

Pennsylvania:
Casey, Robert P., Jr. - (D - PA)
393 Russell Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-6324
Contact:
www.casey.senate.gov/contact/

Toomey, Patrick J. - (R - PA)
248 Russell Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-4254
Contact:
www.toomey.senate.gov/?p=contact

Rhode Island:
Reed, Jack - (D - RI)
728 Hart Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-4642
Contact:
www.reed.senate.gov

Whitehouse, Sheldon - (D - RI)
530 Hart Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-2921
Contact:
www.whitehouse.senate.gov/contact/email-sheldon

South Carolina:
Graham, Lindsey - (R - SC)
290 Russell Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-5972
Contact:
www.lgraham.senate.gov/public/index.cfm/e-mail-senator-gr...

Scott, Tim - (R - SC)
520 Hart Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-6121
Contact:
www.scott.senate.gov/contact/email-me

South Dakota:
Rounds, Mike - (R - SD)
502 Hart Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-5842
Contact:
www.rounds.senate.gov/contact/email-mike

Thune, John - (R - SD)
511 Dirksen Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-2321
Contact:
www.thune.senate.gov/public/index.cfm/contact

Tennessee:
Alexander, Lamar - (R - TN)
455 Dirksen Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-4944
Contact:
www.alexander.senate.gov/public/index.cfm?p=Email

Corker, Bob - (R - TN)
425 Dirksen Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-3344
Contact:
www.corker.senate.gov/public/index.cfm/emailme

Texas:
Cornyn, John - (R - TX)
517 Hart Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-2934
Contact:
www.cornyn.senate.gov/contact

Cruz, Ted - (R - TX)
404 Russell Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-5922
Contact:
www.cruz.senate.gov/?p=email_senator

Utah:
Hatch, Orrin G. - (R - UT)
104 Hart Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-5251
Contact:
www.hatch.senate.gov/public/index.cfm/contact?p=Email-Orrin

Lee, Mike - (R - UT)
361A Russell Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-5444
Contact:
www.lee.senate.gov/public/index.cfm/contact

Vermont:
Leahy, Patrick J. - (D - VT)
437 Russell Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-4242
Contact:
www.leahy.senate.gov/contact/

Sanders, Bernard - (I - VT)
332 Dirksen Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-5141
Contact:
www.sanders.senate.gov/contact/

Virginia:
Kaine, Tim - (D - VA)
231 Russell Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-4024
Contact:
www.kaine.senate.gov/contact

Warner, Mark R. - (D - VA)
475 Russell Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-2023
Contact:
www.warner.senate.gov/public/index.cfm?p=Contact

Washington:
Cantwell, Maria - (D - WA)
511 Hart Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-3441
Contact:
www.cantwell.senate.gov/public/index.cfm/email-maria

Murray, Patty - (D - WA)
154 Russell Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-2621
Contact:
www.murray.senate.gov/public/index.cfm/contactme

West Virginia:
Capito, Shelley Moore - (R - WV)
172 Russell Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-6472
Contact:
www.capito.senate.gov/contact/contact-shelley

Manchin, Joe, III - (D - WV)
306 Hart Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-3954
Contact:
www.manchin.senate.gov/public/index.cfm/contact-form

Wisconsin:
Baldwin, Tammy - (D - WI)
717 Hart Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-5653
Contact:
www.baldwin.senate.gov/feedback

Johnson, Ron - (R - WI)
328 Hart Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-5323
Contact:
www.ronjohnson.senate.gov/public/index.cfm/email-the-sena...

Wyoming:
Barrasso, John - (R - WY)
307 Dirksen Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-6441
Contact:
www.barrasso.senate.gov/public/index.cfm/contact-form

Enzi, Michael B. - (R - WY)
379A Russell Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-3424
Contact:
www.enzi.senate.gov/public/index.cfm/contact?p=e-mail-sen...